afrikani
A fan in front of an installation by Ibrahim Mahama, the young Ghanaian artist creating radical public artworks from an everyday material - old jute cloth sacks. Many of these bags were initially used to transport cocoa. They are covered in markings that tell the story of what they once contained and where they’ve been. Chale Wote festival, Accra, Ghana – August 2014.

A fan in front of an installation by Ibrahim Mahama, the young Ghanaian artist creating radical public artworks from an everyday material - old jute cloth sacks. Many of these bags were initially used to transport cocoa. They are covered in markings that tell the story of what they once contained and where they’ve been. Chale Wote festival, Accra, Ghana – August 2014.

Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama standing in front of a section of his current installation at the Chale Wote Street Art Festival in Accra.  [August 2014 – Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah]

Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama standing in front of a section of his current installation at the Chale Wote Street Art Festival in Accra.  [August 2014 – Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah]

Jessica Mbangeni (left) is South Africa’s only female Imbongi (praise poet) - here dressed in traditional Xhosa outfit.

Jessica Mbangeni (left) is South Africa’s only female Imbongi (praise poet) - here dressed in traditional Xhosa outfit.

Itawuli translates to towel in one of South Africa’s official languages, Xhosa. This flat weave towel is made by Mungo, a boutique weaving mill in the seaside town Plettenberg Bay.

Itawuli translates to towel in one of South Africa’s official languages, Xhosa. This flat weave towel is made by Mungo, a boutique weaving mill in the seaside town Plettenberg Bay.

afrikani:

Life without a Kenyan cotton kikoi is not an option.
Photo ©afrikani

afrikani:

Life without a Kenyan cotton kikoi is not an option.

Photo ©afrikani

In 2012, a floating school in Lagos’s ‘floating’ slum of Makoko was labelled as ‘illegal’ by authorities who then threatened to demolish it. This year [2014] the school, which is the brainchild of Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi, was nominated for the London-based Design Museum’s Design of the Year award.

Close-up on kikoi and shuka, as worn by Maasai men in East Africa.

Close-up on kikoi and shuka, as worn by Maasai men in East Africa.

Classic shuka, worn by Maasai men.

Classic shuka, worn by Maasai men.

Detail of handmade basket from Bolgatanga, northern Ghana.Photo: Ogomeh

Detail of handmade basket from Bolgatanga, northern Ghana.Photo: Ogomeh

Dye master Aboubakar Fofana talks about indigo.

Few modern craftsmen have unlocked indigo’s potential better than Aboubakar Fofana, who has studied traditional indigo production techniques for over three decades and on three continents: at home in Mali, inside ethnology museums in Paris, and alongside Masakazu Akiyama, a Japanese master dyer. [Photo: Gentl + Hyers]

Few modern craftsmen have unlocked indigo’s potential better than Aboubakar Fofana, who has studied traditional indigo production techniques for over three decades and on three continents: at home in Mali, inside ethnology museums in Paris, and alongside Masakazu Akiyama, a Japanese master dyer. [Photo: Gentl + Hyers]

Indigo dyed cloths by master dyer from Mali  Aboubakar Fofana. [Photo: Gentl + Hyers]

Indigo dyed cloths by master dyer from Mali  Aboubakar Fofana. [Photo: Gentl + Hyers]

"Of the blues with natural indigo, I can make 12 different blues, from very light to very dark—I discovered that traditionally, to be an indigo dyer, you have to master these 12 different shades," says Mali’s indigo master Aboubakar Fofana. "Each has a different name and each has a specific emotion". [Photo: Gentl + Hyers]

"Of the blues with natural indigo, I can make 12 different blues, from very light to very dark—I discovered that traditionally, to be an indigo dyer, you have to master these 12 different shades," says Mali’s indigo master Aboubakar Fofana. "Each has a different name and each has a specific emotion". [Photo: Gentl + Hyers]

Vases from the ceramic studio of Clementina van der Walt, Cape Town, South Africa. www.clementina.co.za

Vases from the ceramic studio of Clementina van der Walt, Cape Town, South Africa. www.clementina.co.za