afrikani
The African Choir - unseen for 120 years. A series of 30 images of the African Choir, a group of South African singers that toured Britain from 1891 to 1893. Formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country they also performed for Queen Victoria. During their stay they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

The African Choir - unseen for 120 years. A series of 30 images of the African Choir, a group of South African singers that toured Britain from 1891 to 1893. Formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country they also performed for Queen Victoria. During their stay they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891. Unseen for 120 years - a series of 30 images of the African Choir, a group of South African singers that toured Britain from 1891 to 1893. Formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country they also performed for Queen Victoria. During their stay, they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891. Unseen for 120 years - a series of 30 images of the African Choir, a group of South African singers that toured Britain from 1891 to 1893. Formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country they also performed for Queen Victoria. During their stay, they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

Unseen for 120 years - portraits of the African Choir, a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

Unseen for 120 years - portraits of the African Choir, a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

Packed kiln at Imiso Ceramics in Cape Town South Africa. Works by Andile Dyalvane.

Packed kiln at Imiso Ceramics in Cape Town South Africa. Works by Andile Dyalvane.

Pottery vases by Andile Dyalvane of Imiso Ceramics inspired by the tradition, in some parts of Africa, of body scarification. http://www.imisoceramics.co.za/

Pottery vases by Andile Dyalvane of Imiso Ceramics inspired by the tradition, in some parts of Africa, of body scarification. http://www.imisoceramics.co.za/

This fabulous tote is made by artisans in the Bolgatanga region of Ghana from elephant grass. www.daraartisans.com

This fabulous tote is made by artisans in the Bolgatanga region of Ghana from elephant grass. www.daraartisans.com

A fan in front of an installation by Ibrahim Mahama, the young Ghanaian artist creating radical public artworks from an everyday material - old jute cloth sacks. Many of these bags were initially used to transport cocoa. They are covered in markings that tell the story of what they once contained and where they’ve been. Chale Wote festival, Accra, Ghana – August 2014.

A fan in front of an installation by Ibrahim Mahama, the young Ghanaian artist creating radical public artworks from an everyday material - old jute cloth sacks. Many of these bags were initially used to transport cocoa. They are covered in markings that tell the story of what they once contained and where they’ve been. Chale Wote festival, Accra, Ghana – August 2014.

Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama standing in front of a section of his current installation at the Chale Wote Street Art Festival in Accra.  [August 2014 – Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah]

Ghanaian artist Ibrahim Mahama standing in front of a section of his current installation at the Chale Wote Street Art Festival in Accra.  [August 2014 – Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah]

Jessica Mbangeni (left) is South Africa’s only female Imbongi (praise poet) - here dressed in traditional Xhosa outfit.

Jessica Mbangeni (left) is South Africa’s only female Imbongi (praise poet) - here dressed in traditional Xhosa outfit.

Itawuli translates to towel in one of South Africa’s official languages, Xhosa. This flat weave towel is made by Mungo, a boutique weaving mill in the seaside town Plettenberg Bay.

Itawuli translates to towel in one of South Africa’s official languages, Xhosa. This flat weave towel is made by Mungo, a boutique weaving mill in the seaside town Plettenberg Bay.

afrikani:

Life without a Kenyan cotton kikoi is not an option.
Photo ©afrikani

afrikani:

Life without a Kenyan cotton kikoi is not an option.

Photo ©afrikani

In 2012, a floating school in Lagos’s ‘floating’ slum of Makoko was labelled as ‘illegal’ by authorities who then threatened to demolish it. This year [2014] the school, which is the brainchild of Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi, was nominated for the London-based Design Museum’s Design of the Year award.

Close-up on kikoi and shuka, as worn by Maasai men in East Africa.

Close-up on kikoi and shuka, as worn by Maasai men in East Africa.

Classic shuka, worn by Maasai men.

Classic shuka, worn by Maasai men.